Thursday, May 14, 2015

5 Reasons Why You SHOULD Write Science Books for Children!

3 Myths About Why Writing Science Books for Kids is Hard

April 29, 2015 …and 5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Believe Any of Them!
Jennifer Swanson
From Jennifer Swanson: Let’s face it, many people think that science and writing are two different entities. Science requires you to use your left brain. Why? Because it involves math, logic, and, well . . . science. Writing requires you to use your right brain. It allows people to be more creative, tapping into their emotions, intuitions, and expressiveness. Do you believe all that? Well, the right-brain-left brain thinking is incorrect. Thinking that left-brained people are logical and right-brained people are creative is a myth. Just like these myths about science writing.
Perhaps you’ve heard some of these:
1. You have to have a degree in science.
This is absolutely not true. While it may help a little to have a background in science, especially if you are going to be using scientific papers in your research, it is not a requirement. Plenty of great science authors don’t have formal training in science. What they do have is the willingness to learn and the determination to succeed. If you have that, that’s all you need to be a science writer.
2. You need to work in a science field.
Not true. You don’t need to be a science teacher or a scientist to write books about science for kids. In fact, sometimes the best writers are the ones without any science background because they can really look at the facts and make them understandable to kids who may know very little science, too.
3. Science books are boring and informational.
Not true at all! Today’s science books are fun, exciting, and engaging. Some are extremely interactive and chock full of fun facts, amazing images and active words. Others are beautiful narratives with a thread of science woven so skillfully that readers are drawn into the story and learn something without being aware of it. Science books come in all shapes and sizes these days.
5 Reasons Why You SHOULD Write Science Books for Children:
1. To cover new and innovative topics.
Want to learn about new discoveries in space, a brand new animal from the ocean deep, or how robots work? You can do it here!
2. To get kids excited about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and writing together.
Help kids to see that writing and science go hand in hand with learning and allow them to expand their imaginations
3. To relate science to real-life things/events people actually do.
Write books about real-life scientists or engineers and help kids to see themselves working in these fields one day.
4. To start a conversation about a science topic.
Need a topic for your dinner table? Why not discuss fracking or maybe nuclear power, or even how one plastic bag can change the world.
5. Anyone can write them!
Yes, anyone who is curious about the science all around them every day can be a science writer.
Jennifer Swanson is faculty, along with Miranda Paul and editor Shelby Alinsky, at the Nuts and Bolts of Science Writing workshop this July 5th-9th. They invite you to engage both halves of your brain and leave your myths at the door as they navigate the rocky and sometimes aquatic narrative environment of science writing!

Monday, January 12, 2015

ACT NOW!

Time is running out for the deep discount!

Until January 15th, my rate of $4 per page is slashed to $2.75 per page, and all you have to do to lock in that rate for the next six months is to send a deposit of fifty dollars by the cutoff date. 

The price of $2.75 includes a full edit and an editorial letter outlining what’s working and what may need a closer look--plot, story arc, character development, conflict, sub-plots, and more. If you have questions or concerns, send those along.    

In most cases, an edit will take from a week to ten days for a completed work, but you can also submit in installments and pay as you go. You are welcome to send by regular mail or electronically. I accept payment through PayPal or by personal check. 
 
E-mail with questions or to ask about how and where to submit: claragillowclark(at)gmail(dot)com



Tuesday, December 23, 2014

ACT NOW! Price Slash for Manuscript Edits!


HAPPY HOLIDAYS to all my writing friends! 

It’s the season of giving, but also of resolution and new beginnings. To help you get moving on those writing goals, I’m offering a discount for writers with a YA or MG manuscript for a limited time only. 

From today until January 15th, my rate of $4 per page is slashed to $2.75 per page, and all you have to do to lock in that rate for the next six month is to send a deposit of fifty dollars by the cutoff date. 

The price of $2.75 includes a full edit and an editorial letter outlining what’s working and what may need a closer look--plot, story arc, character development, conflict, sub-plots, and more. If you have questions or concerns, send those along.    

In most cases, an edit will take from a week to ten days for a completed work, but you can also submit in installments and pay as you go. You are welcome to send by regular mail or electronically. I accept payment through PayPal or by personal check. 

Want to learn more? Simply e-mail with your questions or to ask about how and where to submit: claragillowclark(at)gmail(dot)com




Friday, December 19, 2014

BEYOND MAIN CHARACTERS--A WORKSHOP

Dear Friends,

The Highlights Foundation has a great year of writing workshops lined up for you. I'm pleased to share a spring offering that will show you how to raise your novel to a higher level. 

I know you're wondering, so, YES, I'll be giving a talk one evening on transitions and characters. 

Just click on the workshop title, and it will take you to the website. Of course, you'll want to check out the other workshop offerings while you're there!  

Happy writing!

Clara


Beyond Main Characters: An In-Depth Look at Your Supporting Cast and Transitional Scenes 2015

March 29 – April 1, 2015
Your protagonist is real. The conflict concrete. The plot compelling. Your novel seems complete. Yet something is missing. Maybe those supporting characters and transitional scenes need more attention than you’ve given them. But what to do? How can you make …

Thursday, December 11, 2014

MEET THE AUTHORS AT WINTERFEST -- HAWLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY

If you're in the area, please stop by and join in the fun and activities! Be sure to bring the kids along!


Winterfest At the Library
Saturday, December 13, 2014
10:00 am to 1:00 pmCreate a Free Holiday Card. For all ages. Compliments of the Boathouse Restaurant
10:00 am to 12:00 pmChildren's Creative Marshmallow Event. For ages 4-10. Must be accompanied by an adult.
Make a "creature" out of edible supplies. Compliments of Wayne Bank. For registration or details, call the bank's Hawley office at 570.226.6565.
11:00 am to 4:00 pm: Meet the Authors. Local authors will be on hand to talk about their books. Books will be available for sale. 
Jan Cheripko, Clara Gillow Clark, Lindsay Barrett George, Madeline Coppola, Lucia Dailey, Michael Gadomski, Natalie Harnett, Christine San Jose, Patricia Thomas, Terry Mooney, Will Wyckoff, and others.
11:30 am to ??: Soup's On at the Library. Enjoy a variety of homemade soups to eat-in or take out. Small cup is $2, large cup is $4. Bottled water will also be available.

Monday, November 24, 2014

Highlights Foundation!

Follow the links to highlightsfoundation.org





Unworkshops: Your Room to Create with Writer in Residence Dec. 14-20, 2014

December 14 – December 20, 2014
Clara Gillow Clark will be joining us as the writer-in-residence for this week’s unworkshop! She will be available during the week to meet with writers to discuss craft, career goals, and offer manuscript advice. All writers and artists need to …
Workshop Faculty: Clara Gillow Clark

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Winners of the Weenie Books for Halloween

Dear Readers,

Thank you so much for joining the Halloween party with David Lubar. Wasn't he a perfect guest for getting into the spirit of things? I thought so, too. Be sure to read down past the winners, for another treat and a slightly different side of David. Well, sort of . . .

CONGRATULATIONS  to LUCKY WINNER #ONE: Mjolner (the guy in the beret) Please e-mail me (claragillowclark (@) gmail (dot) com) within one week with your mailing address and your autographed copy of  The Battle of the Red Hot Pepper Weenies will be on it's way to you asap!





 CONGRATULATIONS to LUCKY WINNER #TWO: Janet (Writing in the Blackberry Patch) Please e-mail me with your address, and your Halloween treat will be in the mail asap!

You can purchase a copy of Sleeping Freshman Never Lie by David Lubar from your favorite bookseller! (Available in paperback!)  Don't forget to visit David's web-site: http://www.davidlubar.com



From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 7-10 -Scott Hudson is the quintessential freshman. He's small, he's lost, and seniors yoke him for spare change. His honors homework keeps him up all night and his gym teacher is trying to kill him. He joins the paper, runs for student council, and tries out for the play, just to be near a girl he likes. This all backfires. He turns out to be the least athletic sports reporter in school history, and freshman lackey to the sadists on stage crew. Meanwhile, his mother is pregnant. The plot is framed by Scott's journal of advice for the unborn baby. The novel's absurd, comical mood is evident in its entries, like "Scott Hudson's List of Good Things about Getting Beat Up," and jabs at the fetus ("I hope we can recover our investment [in baby furniture] when I sell you."). The author brings the protagonist to three-dimensional life by combining these introspective musings with active, hilarious narration. This format also breaks up the story for slower readers. Scott's character arc is extremely satisfying as he develops his true strengths over the nine months of school and the pregnancy. His interactions with the school delinquent and the heavily pierced new girl are fresh and subtle. Though Scott purposely peppers his journal with SAT words, Lubar's language use and writing style are deceptively simple. The teen's physical and emotional tumult is as clear, familiar, and complex as high school itself.-Johanna Lewis, New York Public Library  
David Lubar

 Thanks for joining us! Have a Happy and Spirited Halloween with good friends and good books! 

My November guest is Theodore Geisel Honor Winner, the Fabulous Illustrator/Author Suzanne Bloom. See you soon . . .